All done

Here's me giving her full throttle

Well she’s finished and if I don’t mind saying so myself it looks great. The client was delighted which is really all that matters. I am so impressed with how Ninigret handles, she will literally turn in just over her own length and at full throttle there is no, not a bit, of cavitation when she’s turned hard over and she feels solid ( there’s no fear of being tossed out of the boat). No wonder Ninigrets designer John Atkin built one for his retirement. A Ninigret would be your perfect day-boat or even tender to a larger boat. Powered by a 30 hp outboard motor in a well she is lightweight, stylish and blissfully quiet.

aftview

Specification:
22′ Length overall
20′ Waterline length
6′ 8″ Beam
12″ Draught
Berths 2
Manual toilet
25-40 hp Outboard
Price incl. Engine and trailer 29,500 euro
Price:24,500 euro boat only

E-mail Tiernan for more details or call +353 (0)28 38973

Built using the finest Bruynzeel Okoume Marine plywood which is then encapsulated in West System Epoxy and finished with two part epoxy and polyurethane paint. A Roeboats built Ninigret will be your perfect low maintenance and low fuel consuming stylish day-boat or camp cruiser.

Just the right amount of throttle for the weight

STOP PRESS: Ninigret was chosen as Wooden Boat Magazine’s Boat of the week see here.

Minimal wake means all the power is used to go forward.

Helm

cockpit

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

A boat is born

 

Here’s a short slide show of the boat being winched up on to the trailer. It went very smoothly i just put some wooden rollers under the keel for the first half and then a piece of greased melamine coated chipboard for the last few feet. I subsequently spread the aft rollers a little to increase the distance between the chine and the rails on the trailer.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Nearly finished

Well I’m getting very close to finishing this boat and I’ve started planning the building of the next. I’m hoping someone will order another Ninigret or I have a few more plans for some excellent motor boats and sail boats that I would like to build. I’ll be blogging about them in the future. As you can see, the decks are painted and I’m masking them off for the non-slip paint. I had tried adding non slip additive to the two part polyurethane but it looked horrible and was a disaster to put on. So I got some International non-slip deck paint and had West Cork Paint Supplies custom tint it for me; it turned out so good that the customer thought it was an after-market transfer.

nearlyfinished1150pix

At this stage in the game I have been working 14 hour days, so things have really started to move along plus it is now possible to actually start fixing things into the boat like the deck hardware and the windows. Speaking of which I had intended leaving the windows out until last; but I had some time to use up while I waited for some epoxy to go off; so I popped in the glass. I knew I had a good reason to leave out the glass and that became apparent when I tried bolting on the grab rails. It would have been quite easy without the glass; but with it in I was going to have to stretch my arms by a few feet to be able to tighten the nuts. These long days are starting to work against me.

nearlyfinished2150pix

You can see in this photo that the engine is in (it’s under the blanket and the holes either side are to allow access to the bilge area under the motor well, unbelievably I can get my upper body through that hole. Not something I would want to do when alone it’s a very tight fit and not somewhere I’d like to get stuck. It provides somewhere to store long objects like fenders, boat hook and camp chairs.nearlyfinished3150pixHere’s the pointy end with the mooring cleat and hatch fitted and waiting for the outer rubrail to be fitted. At this stage there’s a few more coats of green topcoat to apply, the seats have to be fitted and I have to finish off the engine installation. So it’s really starting to come together. Hopefully it won’t take much longer I’m dying to take her for a burn, I mean sea trials.

nearlyfinished4150pix

I built the consoles as designed. The starboard one will have a grab handle and shelves for Binoculars and flasks etc. The steps on the bottom are needed because the forward facing seats are about six inches higher than a normal seat to give a good view over the bow. The seats will be the next thing to be fitted.

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Inch by Inch, Row by row, launch time gets closer.

I know it looks like I’m still a long way off form launching but I’m a lot closer than when I was doing this.

deckprimed

The cabin is now finished; so all I have to do is fit the windows and the toilet. As you can see I’ve started priming the decks. Motor well, seats and console are made and being painted. I picked up the motor at the weekend from Marine Motors in Cork and I have all the chandlery; which I was able to get in C H Marine in Skibbereen. (Here’s a tip you can get a 5% discount if you order online and select to pick it up at one of their shops. Discounts are always good.) I was able to get all of the two part epoxy and polyurethane paint for the boat in Skibbereen also, from West Cork Paint Supplies (028 23162). If you’re going to try being eco friendly it should start close to home.

Anyway I have a mountain of things to do before I’m finished; but I can see that each day I’m getting closer.

cockpitandconsole

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Deck on, Cabin trunk in and Roof under construction

As you can see I’ve been busy for the last two weeks and have made quite a bit of progress. 70 hour weeks don’t leave much time for blogging. I put a couple of long days in last week and was able to complete most of the deck and the cabin trunk. It took a bit of figuring out how to support the roof but I’m hoping my solution will be strong enough. I’m going to use a T shaped deck beam and lodging knees ( that will double as hand holds) to stiffen the middle deck beam.

Deck on

I’m feeling so enthusiastic I’ve started designing the seating and all the other important details that go in to finishing a boat. The colours are almost nailed down and I’m awaiting the arrival of the engine before I finish the engine well and construct the helm station. Here’s a view of Ninigrets large cockpit. The cabin doors are made and hopefully all going well I should have the cabin completed by the end of the week, hopefully, as long as I don’t screw it up in my excitement.

Cockpit

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Progress continues on Ninigret 22′ power boat

Well progress has been continuing apace on fitting out the hull of Ninigret and while a lot of work has been done I’m afraid there’s very little to show you. Most of the cabin fit out is complete and is currently being painted before installation. So that’s just a pile of wood and an empty space in the hull. The bilge has been painted and shouldn’t need to be redone for a very long time. The two part epoxy paint I used is rated for use in chemical tankers so it’s pretty tough stuff and boy is it hard to sand. The cockpit floor is in and all of the parts for the motor well are fabricated and being painted. This week I’ve started on the deck ( you can see the first of the deck beams in the right hand side of the photo ) and hopefully soon enough it will start to look like I’ve been doing something.

parts painted and awaiting installation

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Roeboats featured in Marine Times

I was delighted to see that Roeboats was featured in the May edition of the Marine Times. The Marine Times is Irelands leading marine newspaper and covers all aspects of maritime affairs from commercial to cultural and economic. You can access the April edition for free online here. Roeboats was featured in the May edition.

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Hull No. 1 Rollover at Roeboats

Finally I and a few helpers rolled over the first Roeboat hull. It’s a John Atkin designed Ninigret 22′ outboard power boat. I thought that I would post a slide show of the rollover. Let me know what you think of it. Four people were able to lift the hull but there were seven of us to roll it over. It all went very smoothly really, we rolled the whole shebang out of the workshop. Took it off the strong back, lifted it up on to its side on some cushions and dropped it down on its bottom. Placed it back in line with the workshop door rolled it back inside and closed the whole thing back up again. So a big thank you to all those who helped, I quite obviously couldn’t have done it without you.

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Torturing plywood and myself as well

Well finally got all of the chines, battens and inwales fitted; so it was time to start sheathing the bottom with the 3/8″ ply. I had expected the bow panels to be difficult to fit as the plywood has to twist through 90 degrees. Not an easy thing to get plywood to do. It wasn’t going too bad making the templates and indeed getting the ply to fit loosely seemed doable and I left them like that for 2 days, to take the shape and they did.

Planking so far

Planking so far

But when I started to clamp it down into position that’s when the fun started with slipping clamps and more than once I got a slap in the face as the ply sprang out from under a clamp and I broke a panel, it went off like a gun shot. After struggling like this for way too long I decided to go for it an glue and nail the panel into place. The first one was actually okay to do but when I was half way through the second one it decided to explode. You can take it for granted that at this stage I was trawling through some pretty rude sailor talk to come up with an expletive I hadn’t used in the previous two days. Anyway back to my fine mess of glue and broken ply. I just had to call it a day. I walked out the workshop door and I realised that more than once I looked at the solution. It was a plain as the nose on my face but not as ugly. Rotate the ply by ninety degrees so that there were more veneers with the grain parallel to the bend than against it. That simple. And it was that simple. I redid this on the broken panel and it went in no bothers. Well I suppose it was the third or fourth time I had done it. The rest of the bottom planking went on without much fuss at all. I’ve started planking the top sides today and have the motor well framed out. As bob the builder says Yes we can.

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home

Assembling Frames

I have been very busy finishing this project and building the boat. Despite this I’ve been able to fabricate the frames and bevel them; now all that remains is to assemble them. I am about halfway through at this stage. The temporary cross beams have to be attached and the excess glue and fingerprints sanded off before they can be set up on the strongback. Here’s a photo.

frames

Behind the doors is my new extension.

And just to keep me organised a list of things to do before setting up the frames.

  1. Finish glueing up frames and bulkheads
  2. Decide location of and plane,cut and attach cross beams,
  3. Scarf up chines, battens, inwales and apron,
  4. Shape, joint, bevel and assemble keel
  5. Build and level strong back

Oh boy that’s a lot of stuff to get done so I’m off.

Roeboats, Ballydehob, Co. Cork, t:+353 (0)28 38973 m: +353 (0)86 158 69 37 e:roeboats@ymail.com

Home